products 
things that define and embody supercyclers' principles 
Objects of the Turn
by Postfossil

One in a series of sculptures made from sustainably sourced Swiss timber for the pivotal exhibition SOS supercycle our souls in Milan 2012.
These simple geometric forms are 
a sculptural manifestation by Swiss colective Postfossil's designer Thomas Walde. Thomas' proposition is that there are certain moments throughout history which become pivotal points in time - when thinking radically shifts and a new way of thinking and of life follows. In terms of a sustainable world Thomas saw this moment as that time, and we agree.
Plastic Bag Light
by Sarah K for supercyclers

Created from a single use plastic bag formed  over a metal and timber frame the light gives purpose and beauty to the  ugliest and most discarded of our waste.
It pays hommage in its design to 
Achille Castiglioni's il Gatto which also utilised a new material method of production. The light was designed for the inaugural supercyclers exhibition SOS supercycle our souls in Milan 2012.

Newspaper Wood
by Vij5 & Meike Meijer

Newspaper wood is a new material 
developed as a collaboration between Dutch brand Vij5 and designer Meike Meijer. It is created from discarded newspapers compressed together with an eco-glue, and displays traits of timber in its rigidity and when it is cut shows a wood-like  grain that refers to it's ancestral roots.
The material can be used to make furniture and objects, some of which also appear here - and has been used in a number of applications by Vij5 including a car interior.
Developed and first presented in 2011.
Paint Clamp Side Table
by Henry Wilson

A series of simple timber planks held together by the discarded paint clamp from a used tin of paint, form an elegant and contemporary  side table. 
This object of design by Henry Wilson demonstrates the designer's own brand of superfusion, which lies somewhere between the realm of the purely functional objects and tools of a hardware store and a sophisticated interior design atelier.
Superfusion  - the idea of fusing waste / junk to materials of value in a way that customises the material of value to the junk - giving respect to the waste and raising its value.
Unexpanded Polystyrene Bowls
by Mark Vaarwerk

Polystyrene is f**kd - it never breaks down ever and it splits into a million tiny little balls and disappears out of view but it is not gone... These bowls, literally unexpanded polystyrene are the considered reworking of the broccoli and other discarded polystyrene vegetable boxes Mark finds in the lanes behind restaurants. After shaping, unexpanding and fusing the material like an alchemist, so that it has a dense brittle character more reminiscent of ceramic, he glazes the pieces with concoctions of other waste he finds on his walks, like cigarette butts and discarded computer keyboards.
Ghostware
by Liane Rossler + Sarah K for supercyclers

Liane Rossler and Sarah K set themselves the task of creating something beautiful and useful from the ugliest and most discarded of waste, the single use plastic bag...

The vessels that form the body of work that is Ghostware are lightweight ethereal pieces that make reference to a hope that in the future, plastic bags will be a ghost of the past...

Cafe Chairs
by Ben Blakebrough

Blakebrough has used the ubiquitous Eames fibreglass shell chair as inspiration and as a launching place for the re-use of the jute bags that coffee beans arrive to the roasters in from around the globe - from Nicuragua to Papua. In this case the resin used to create the seat is organic, developed in Germany, so the familiar mass produced fibreshell or plastic chair is re-interpreted in a completely sustainable and biodegradable way. 
Available through Pamono.com in flavours natural jute, illustrated natural jute and natural dyed black.
Brass Superfused Vase
by Sarah K for supercyclers

After creating the vertically challenged vases of the Yours To Care For project with Liane Rossler, Sarah K took the idea a step further. In order for the YTCF single stem vases  to stand on a surface she customised a fused-straw-shaped-hole  through the centre of geometric sections of brass, marble and copper to perfectly house the straw / water /single stem or tiny bouquet of flowers.
*Superfusion  - the idea of fusing waste / junk to materials of value in a way that customises the material of value to the junk - giving respect to the waste and raising its value.
Quilt Light Template
by Tamara maynes

Perhaps the most sustainable piece of very good design with the lightest footprint ever realised, the Quilt Template is a downloadable template that will set you back the princely sum of $AU20.
Access the template online  - print it out and lay it down over any mf thing you can lay your hands on - cardboard, plastic, as long as its stiffish and flattish you can make a quilt light of your own - or as many as you like.
genius
Blown
by Liane Rossler

After collecting all the bottles of alcohol from all the good times over the years, Liane Rossler re-blew them into beautiful vases, in her signature organic yet modern shapes, the only clue as to their former life - the colours  of the glass the brand of alcohol comes in ie - sapphire gin blue
An idea of re-use so simple and elegant it could only be supercycling.
Marine Debris Bakelite Bento Box
by Andrew Simpson + Sarah K
for supercyclers

Marine Debris Bakelite is a new material created from 100% plastic washed out of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch onto Australian beaches.
The Bento box has been designed to be used as a compact snack box, to keep you from getting hangry, but it's equally as useful as a little storage box, or toiletries container. What's more, by purchasing one the user is literally removing that much plastic from the ocean. Mass production has never been so embraceable: the more we consume the more we clean up the ocean!
Botanica Vessel
by Formafantasma

The Botanica Vessels are the result of Sicilian / Netherlands based design duo Formafantasma's investigations into pre fossil fuel plastics. 
Using the results of their experiments with naturally plastic sources like plant resins and animal byproducts formafantasma evolved a beautiful and aesthetic range of vessels that display the colours of their findings in their appearance.
The products from the Botanica collection  retrace a path from the past that might lead to potentially new,  more sustaiable directions for the future.
Broom Handle Chair
by Sarah K for supercyclers

After breaking her favourite vintage broom's handle and still attached to the beautiful timber where hands had smoothed the surface over time,
Sarah K set about using the dowel from this and three other brooms found at the tip, to create a simple and elegant chair with a hand woven papercord seat.
Junk Press
by Andrew Simpson

A sort of jaffle for cooking up small vessels, Junk Press was inspired by the reams of junk mail that perpetually and magically appears in our post boxes.

In his usual fashion, Andrew Simpson saw this stuff (junk mail is almost waste before it is ever even useful) as a resource and set about making a machine that anyone can purchase and use to make vessels using a series of different moulds to suit different moods. Beauty out of the mess...
Yours to Care For
by Liane Rossler + Sarah k
​for superyclers

Over 500 million plastic drinking straws are being used and discarded every day. 
The designers  used their hair straighteners to gently heat a straw with heat proof paper, fusing one end flat to form horizontal single stem vases.
Through an osmotic trick of science water in the straw doesn't come out unless shaken and the weeds foraged + placed in the single stem vases will drink up the water and decorate a table with pretty green.
"...such a short trip from the drink to your mouth" - Liane Rossler
Kami Light
by Ett la Benn

The Kami Light is the result of applying industrialised techniques on a small scale to mimic the handmade, using sustainable materials.

Ett la Benn developed a paper cellulose pulp that is rotationally spun in a machine into the mould to produce textural objects like the kami light.
No Heater Winter Chair
by Sarah K for supercyclers

The chair was commissioned by the Wool Board . The designer collaborated with Waverly Wool Mills in Tasmania to create the softest wool upholstery on the planet.

The wide, cocooning chair incorporates a series of accessories; a wool cape, that unfolds and wraps around the user, a pair of wool booties, a wool helmet and mittens so that it is not necessary to turn the heating on, especially in between seaons.

Stir
by Postfossil

Another of Postfossil's subtle sustainable lifestyle ideas...
...to encourage us away from store-bought drinks and  packaging they require, designer Anna Blattert has created a glass to make flavoured drink using citrus fruit and herbs.
When many people adopt a way of behaving,  a small idea can 
potentially have a big impact...
Rubberweight Light
by Henry Wilson Sarah K + Dale Hardiman for supercyclers

 Henry Wilson's cast bronze light fitting invites a third material to complete the shade..
He collaborated with Sarah K + Dale Hardiman, to create from sheets of rubber sourced from an industrial rubber factory, the rubberweight ight.
Natural Grain Kite Stool
by Ben Blakebrough for supercyclers

The natural grain kite stool takes the form of Blakebrough+King's most classic piece - the metal kite stool or sidetable and reapppropriates it into a mould which fits into a 3 tonne press .

Any food by-product; (the version pictured is composed of rice straw) is mixed with an eco-resin and fed into the mould to make a solid usable piece of furniture with a seemingly impossible smooth geometry that contains the organic matter visible in its form.
A3 Joint Stool
by Henry Wilson

Another in the A-joint series - this particular incarnation is capable of adding four elements to create a stool, sidetable or small dining table.

The DIY beauty of the A-joint system is that you can make a choice about recycling existing materials, use new materials or a mix of both  to create furniture designed with your help by Henry Wilson.
Quilt Light Template
by Tamara Maynes

Tamara's own interpretation of the Quilt Light that she invented and has given to the world in the form of a downloadable DIY  template, designed for and displayed as part of the SOS supercycle our souls exhibition in Milan 2012.
Best moment; watching Tom Dixon at the exhibition,  reading Tamara's words on the wall behind the light alongside a vinyl version of the template on the wall and reading his mind as he thought to himself (having just launched his own flatpacked metal lighting range that Salone) "why didn't I think of that"
Wassily Chair
by Henry Wilson

Rescued from the side of the road,  the blue frame of a Wassily replica, has been updated in a simple, elegant  way using natural  leather and giving something discarded and value-less  a stylish new lease on life.
Unexpannded Polystyrene Jewelry
by Mark Vaarwerk

More of Mark's work with unexpanded polystyrene these pieces of jewellery are  literally unexpanded polystyrene, a considered reworking of the broccoli and other discarded polystyrene vegetable boxes Mark finds in the lanes behind restaurants. After shaping, unexpanding and fusing the material like an alchemist, so that it has a dense brittle character more reminiscent of ceramic, he glazes the pieces with concoctions of other waste he finds on his walks, like cigarette butts and discarded computer keyboards
6:1
by Kirstie Van Noort

Based on the idea that in the porcelain-making process there is 6 parts of wasted earth coloured material to every one part of the whitest porcelain used...

Instead of discarding the waste, Kirstie Van Noort uses the material to make 6 earth-coloured objects to every one white one, and in the process highlights the beautiy inherent in all of it.
ie. every one white cup in the set of 7 there is another 6 that are a beautiful pink-y brown and this goes for the plates and bowls too.


Cutting Saw Knife
by Ben Blakebrough

Over the years, metal worker Ben Blakebrough kept his broken cutting saws, partly as the material is such fine quality and partly as the markings on their surface are so beautiful.

He now uses this stock pile of material to create the most impervious steel knives with shou sugi ban (traditional Japanese blackening technique through charring timber) handles to make a series ithat includes the chef's, the cleaver, and the builder's companion.
Fred & Ginger
by Postfossil

Sometimes the simplest of ideas just are the best solution. In this case a sustainable attitude comes from creating a dustpan and broom of such beauty, from  the finest Swiss Timber, and handmade by members of the blind institute, that you are encouraged to keep them displayed in the house in plain view, and hence because they are at hand, use them in favour of bringing out the vacuum cleaner and running the electricity.

Solar vase
by Andrew Simpson

A recycled solar panel is re blown to new life as an incalmo case.

so simple and double the sustainable attitude.
Marble Superfused Vse
by Sarah K for supercyclers

After creating the vertically challenged vases of the Yours To Care For project with Liane Rossler, Sarah K took the idea a step further. In order for the YTCF single stem vases  to stand on a surface she customised a fused-straw-shaped-hole  through the centre of geometric sections of brass, marble and copper to perfectly house the straw / water /single stem or tiny bouquet of flowers.
Coffee Table
by for Newspaper Wood

Newspaper wood is a new material 
developed as a collaboration between Dutch brand Vij5 and designer Meike Meijer. It is created from discarded newspapers compressed together with an eco-glue, and displays traits of timber in its rigidity and when it is cut shows a wood-like  grain that refers to it's ancestral roots.
The material can be used to make furntirue and objects, some of which also appear here - and has been used in a number of applications by Vij5 including
Marine Debris Bakelite Door Handle
by Andrew Simpson

Mould for a door handle made from Marine Debris Bakelite.

 
Kami Objects
by Ett la Benn

These beautiful test objects are the result of applying industrialised techniques on a small scale to mimic the handmade, using sustainable materials.

Ett la Benn developed a paper cellulose pulp that is rotationally spun in a machine into the mould to produce textural objects like the kami light.


A-Joint Marble Table
by Henry Wilson

The A-Joint is a cast metal system that allows the user to take off-the-shelf or recycled components and put together furniture, in this case a marble topped table.

The DIY beauty of the A-joint system is that you can make a choice about recycling exisitng materials, use new materials or a mix of both  to create furniture designed with your help by Henry Wilson.
Storage Cabinet
by Newspaper Wood

Newspaper wood is a new material 
developed as a collaboration between Dutch brand Vij5 and designer Meike Meijer. It is created from discarded newspapers compressed together with an eco-glue, and displays traits of timber in its rigidity and when it is cut shows a wood-like  grain that refers to it's ancestral roots.
The material can be used to make furntirue and objects, some of which also appear here - and has been used in a number of applications by Vij5 including
Seljak Blankets
by Seljak

These recycled wool blankets are created from offcuts from the wool mill floor. Made with 70% recycled Australian merino wool and a 30% blend of recycled alpaca, mohair and cotton from the luxury blanket production process, as well as polyester for strength. 
After the blankets have enjoyed a long, adventurous life, Seljak Brand collect them free of charge using a carbon neutral courier service. Back at the mill, they're shredded and spun it into new yarn to make future blankets.
 For every ten sold, Seljak Brand sends one blanket to the Asylum Seeker Resource Centre in Victoria. 


HuskeeCup
by Vert Design

Made from a custom eco-composite polymer formulated with 33% waste coffee bean husk, reducing waste from the coffee farm and landfills through to the cafes who adopt HuskeeCup.
HuskeeCup is intended as both a dinein or takeaway cup and enables the development of a world first ‘swap’ system where cafes and consumers use and exchange a single cup, significantly altering consumer behaviour and cafe workflows to enable a sustainable coffee consumption ecosystem while silultaneouslye transforming waste into a financial resource for the coffee farmers involved in the process.